Go to main contentGo to main menu

Logo de la UAMUniversidad Autónoma de Madrid

Noticias

Evolution and Adaptation, 150 years after the Origin of the Species

05/07/2010

This is the title of a recently published text, which has become a benchmark in the panorama of Spanish research on evolution.

The US National Science Foundation (NSF) twice yearly elaborates and publishes the 'Science and Technology Indicators'. It is a study that provides quantitative information on these activities and their perception in society, in order to help to understand the current scientific panorama and its future developments. During the past weeks there has been some debate on the 2010 edition of the 'Indicators' as it has suppressed the study of the evaluation (true or false) of the following statement which, in previous editions, aimed to evaluate the level of knowledge that American citizens have of the theory of evolution: "Human beings, as we know them nowadays, developed from already existing animal species".

Without considering here the reasons that led the NSF to suppress this section of the survey, suffice to say that in previous editions of the 'Indicators' only 45% of US citizens considered this statement to be true. Although the situation is Europe is qualitatively different (70% of the population accepts the statement as valid), the fact leads us to consider the importance of celebrating significant events or occasions to report and consolidate scientific knowledge. And in the field of evolutionary theory, nothing better than the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin and the 150th anniversary of the publication of his most important work 'Origin of Species', which took place in 2009.

In this context, the Spanish Society for Evolutionary Biology (SESBE), a society founded in 2005 to promote and disseminate Evolutionary Biology in Spain, published a book entitled 'Evolution and Adaptation, 150 years after Origin of Species'. The work, edited by Hernán Dopazo (CIPF, Valencia) and Arcadi Navarro (ICREA, Barcelona), takes advantage of the circumstances provided by the 'Year of Darwin' to offer a compilation of 51 works (by 101 authors) on the theme of Evolution. Among them are several contributions by researchers from the UAM and the Centre of Molecular Biology "Severo Ochoa" (CSIC-UAM) [J. L. Sanz, Á. D. Buscalioni, B. Chamero, A. Pascual-García, J. Traba and M. B. Morales].

One important aspect is that all the contributions to the book are in the first person; that is, the authors reflect the contributions of their own research and, subsequently, provide a good reference of the quantity and quality of evolutionary studies that have been and continue to be carried out in Spain. Another relevant aspect is the wide range of subject matters which, under the heading of the evolutionary process, encompasses from molecular evolution and genomics to the teaching of evolution in secondary education texts. For this reason, and beyond the justified interest that it may awaken in researchers and teachers, this work is particularly to be recommended for university students as it offers, in an agile and accessible way, an updated vision of the research that is being carried out on evolution and adaptation in their most immediate geographical and linguistic environment: as the text is in Spanish and the authors are Spaniards and Latin Americans. This utility is greatly enhanced by the brief, synthetic nature of the contributions (an average of 9-10 pages long) and by the fact that many articles include, as well as the compulsory bibliographical references, a section on 'recommended reading' (unfortunately not all of the contributions include this section). On the other hand, the book 'Evolution and Adaptation' not only provides students with abundant theoretical information, but also identifies who carries out the different lines of work, and where; something that is particularly useful for postgraduate students who are trying to identify potential centres and interest groups for their professional future.

On the downside, the book lacks a thematic index to help the reader to circulate through such an abundant amount of information contained in the volume, or the fact that some figures have not been reproduced in a larger size to make it easier to inspect them. Such details however, do not tarnish the outstanding virtues of 'Evolution and Adaptation', which make it a benchmark, for specialists as well as students, of the panorama of Spanish research on evolution in the 21st century we have just entered. While it is true that the book does not include all the studies that exist, but it is no less true that all the studies included exist.... and many are included. At least enough to ensure enviable good health for evolutionary studies in our country in the coming years.

Ángel Baltanás
Department of Ecology
Faculty of Sciences
UAM

Evolution and Adaptation, 150 years after Origin of Species. Dopazo, Hernán and Navarro, Arcadi (Eds.). Editorial Obrapropia. Valencia, 2009. ISBN 978-84-92910-06-9

Evolution and Adaptation,

The US National Science Foundation (NSF) twice yearly elaborates and publishes the 'Science and Technology Indicators'. It is a study that provides quantitative information on these activities and their perception in society, in order to help to understand the current scientific panorama and its future developments. During the past weeks there has been some debate on the 2010 edition of the 'Indicators' as it has suppressed the study of the evaluation (true or false) of the following statement which, in previous editions, aimed to evaluate the level of knowledge that American citizens have of the theory of evolution: "Human beings, as we know them nowadays, developed from already existing animal species".

Without considering here the reasons that led the NSF to suppress this section of the survey, suffice to say that in previous editions of the 'Indicators' only 45% of US citizens considered this statement to be true. Although the situation is Europe is qualitatively different (70% of the population accepts the statement as valid), the fact leads us to consider the importance of celebrating significant events or occasions to report and consolidate scientific knowledge. And in the field of evolutionary theory, nothing better than the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin and the 150th anniversary of the publication of his most important work 'Origin of Species', which took place in 2009.

In this context, the Spanish Society for Evolutionary Biology (SESBE), a society founded in 2005 to promote and disseminate Evolutionary Biology in Spain, published a book entitled 'Evolution and Adaptation, 150 years after Origin of Species'. The work, edited by Hernán Dopazo (CIPF, Valencia) and Arcadi Navarro (ICREA, Barcelona), takes advantage of the circumstances provided by the 'Year of Darwin' to offer a compilation of 51 works (by 101 authors) on the theme of Evolution. Among them are several contributions by researchers from the UAM and the Centre of Molecular Biology "Severo Ochoa" (CSIC-UAM) [J. L. Sanz, Á. D. Buscalioni, B. Chamero, A. Pascual-García, J. Traba and M. B. Morales].

One important aspect is that all the contributions to the book are in the first person; that is, the authors reflect the contributions of their own research and, subsequently, provide a good reference of the quantity and quality of evolutionary studies that have been and continue to be carried out in Spain. Another relevant aspect is the wide range of subject matters which, under the heading of the evolutionary process, encompasses from molecular evolution and genomics to the teaching of evolution in secondary education texts. For this reason, and beyond the justified interest that it may awaken in researchers and teachers, this work is particularly to be recommended for university students as it offers, in an agile and accessible way, an updated vision of the research that is being carried out on evolution and adaptation in their most immediate geographical and linguistic environment: as the text is in Spanish and the authors are Spaniards and Latin Americans. This utility is greatly enhanced by the brief, synthetic nature of the contributions (an average of 9-10 pages long) and by the fact that many articles include, as well as the compulsory bibliographical references, a section on 'recommended reading' (unfortunately not all of the contributions include this section). On the other hand, the book 'Evolution and Adaptation' not only provides students with abundant theoretical information, but also identifies who carries out the different lines of work, and where; something that is particularly useful for postgraduate students who are trying to identify potential centres and interest groups for their professional future.

On the downside, the book lacks a thematic index to help the reader to circulate through such an abundant amount of information contained in the volume, or the fact that some figures have not been reproduced in a larger size to make it easier to inspect them. Such details however, do not tarnish the outstanding virtues of 'Evolution and Adaptation', which make it a benchmark, for specialists as well as students, of the panorama of Spanish research on evolution in the 21st century we have just entered. While it is true that the book does not include all the studies that exist, but it is no less true that all the studies included exist.... and many are included. At least enough to ensure enviable good health for evolutionary studies in our country in the coming years.

Ángel Baltanás
Department of Ecology
Faculty of Sciences
UAM

Evolution and Adaptation, 150 years after Origin of Species. Dopazo, Hernán and Navarro, Arcadi (Eds.). Editorial Obrapropia. Valencia, 2009. ISBN 978-84-92910-06-9

Evolution and Adaptation,

The US National Science Foundation (NSF) twice yearly elaborates and publishes the 'Science and Technology Indicators'. It is a study that provides quantitative information on these activities and their perception in society, in order to help to understand the current scientific panorama and its future developments. During the past weeks there has been some debate on the 2010 edition of the 'Indicators' as it has suppressed the study of the evaluation (true or false) of the following statement which, in previous editions, aimed to evaluate the level of knowledge that American citizens have of the theory of evolution: "Human beings, as we know them nowadays, developed from already existing animal species".

Without considering here the reasons that led the NSF to suppress this section of the survey, suffice to say that in previous editions of the 'Indicators' only 45% of US citizens considered this statement to be true. Although the situation is Europe is qualitatively different (70% of the population accepts the statement as valid), the fact leads us to consider the importance of celebrating significant events or occasions to report and consolidate scientific knowledge. And in the field of evolutionary theory, nothing better than the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin and the 150th anniversary of the publication of his most important work 'Origin of Species', which took place in 2009.

In this context, the Spanish Society for Evolutionary Biology (SESBE), a society founded in 2005 to promote and disseminate Evolutionary Biology in Spain, published a book entitled 'Evolution and Adaptation, 150 years after Origin of Species'. The work, edited by Hernán Dopazo (CIPF, Valencia) and Arcadi Navarro (ICREA, Barcelona), takes advantage of the circumstances provided by the 'Year of Darwin' to offer a compilation of 51 works (by 101 authors) on the theme of Evolution. Among them are several contributions by researchers from the UAM and the Centre of Molecular Biology "Severo Ochoa" (CSIC-UAM) [J. L. Sanz, Á. D. Buscalioni, B. Chamero, A. Pascual-García, J. Traba and M. B. Morales].

One important aspect is that all the contributions to the book are in the first person; that is, the authors reflect the contributions of their own research and, subsequently, provide a good reference of the quantity and quality of evolutionary studies that have been and continue to be carried out in Spain. Another relevant aspect is the wide range of subject matters which, under the heading of the evolutionary process, encompasses from molecular evolution and genomics to the teaching of evolution in secondary education texts. For this reason, and beyond the justified interest that it may awaken in researchers and teachers, this work is particularly to be recommended for university students as it offers, in an agile and accessible way, an updated vision of the research that is being carried out on evolution and adaptation in their most immediate geographical and linguistic environment: as the text is in Spanish and the authors are Spaniards and Latin Americans. This utility is greatly enhanced by the brief, synthetic nature of the contributions (an average of 9-10 pages long) and by the fact that many articles include, as well as the compulsory bibliographical references, a section on 'recommended reading' (unfortunately not all of the contributions include this section). On the other hand, the book 'Evolution and Adaptation' not only provides students with abundant theoretical information, but also identifies who carries out the different lines of work, and where; something that is particularly useful for postgraduate students who are trying to identify potential centres and interest groups for their professional future.

On the downside, the book lacks a thematic index to help the reader to circulate through such an abundant amount of information contained in the volume, or the fact that some figures have not been reproduced in a larger size to make it easier to inspect them. Such details however, do not tarnish the outstanding virtues of 'Evolution and Adaptation', which make it a benchmark, for specialists as well as students, of the panorama of Spanish research on evolution in the 21st century we have just entered. While it is true that the book does not include all the studies that exist, but it is no less true that all the studies included exist.... and many are included. At least enough to ensure enviable good health for evolutionary studies in our country in the coming years.

Ángel Baltanás
Department of Ecology
Faculty of Sciences
UAM

Evolution and Adaptation, 150 years after Origin of Species. Dopazo, Hernán and Navarro, Arcadi (Eds.). Editorial Obrapropia. Valencia, 2009. ISBN 978-84-92910-06-9

Evolution and Adaptation,

The US National Science Foundation (NSF) twice yearly elaborates and publishes the 'Science and Technology Indicators'. It is a study that provides quantitative information on these activities and their perception in society, in order to help to understand the current scientific panorama and its future developments. During the past weeks there has been some debate on the 2010 edition of the 'Indicators' as it has suppressed the study of the evaluation (true or false) of the following statement which, in previous editions, aimed to evaluate the level of knowledge that American citizens have of the theory of evolution: "Human beings, as we know them nowadays, developed from already existing animal species".

Without considering here the reasons that led the NSF to suppress this section of the survey, suffice to say that in previous editions of the 'Indicators' only 45% of US citizens considered this statement to be true. Although the situation is Europe is qualitatively different (70% of the population accepts the statement as valid), the fact leads us to consider the importance of celebrating significant events or occasions to report and consolidate scientific knowledge. And in the field of evolutionary theory, nothing better than the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin and the 150th anniversary of the publication of his most important work 'Origin of Species', which took place in 2009.

In this context, the Spanish Society for Evolutionary Biology (SESBE), a society founded in 2005 to promote and disseminate Evolutionary Biology in Spain, published a book entitled 'Evolution and Adaptation, 150 years after Origin of Species'. The work, edited by Hernán Dopazo (CIPF, Valencia) and Arcadi Navarro (ICREA, Barcelona), takes advantage of the circumstances provided by the 'Year of Darwin' to offer a compilation of 51 works (by 101 authors) on the theme of Evolution. Among them are several contributions by researchers from the UAM and the Centre of Molecular Biology "Severo Ochoa" (CSIC-UAM) [J. L. Sanz, Á. D. Buscalioni, B. Chamero, A. Pascual-García, J. Traba and M. B. Morales].

One important aspect is that all the contributions to the book are in the first person; that is, the authors reflect the contributions of their own research and, subsequently, provide a good reference of the quantity and quality of evolutionary studies that have been and continue to be carried out in Spain. Another relevant aspect is the wide range of subject matters which, under the heading of the evolutionary process, encompasses from molecular evolution and genomics to the teaching of evolution in secondary education texts. For this reason, and beyond the justified interest that it may awaken in researchers and teachers, this work is particularly to be recommended for university students as it offers, in an agile and accessible way, an updated vision of the research that is being carried out on evolution and adaptation in their most immediate geographical and linguistic environment: as the text is in Spanish and the authors are Spaniards and Latin Americans. This utility is greatly enhanced by the brief, synthetic nature of the contributions (an average of 9-10 pages long) and by the fact that many articles include, as well as the compulsory bibliographical references, a section on 'recommended reading' (unfortunately not all of the contributions include this section). On the other hand, the book 'Evolution and Adaptation' not only provides students with abundant theoretical information, but also identifies who carries out the different lines of work, and where; something that is particularly useful for postgraduate students who are trying to identify potential centres and interest groups for their professional future.

On the downside, the book lacks a thematic index to help the reader to circulate through such an abundant amount of information contained in the volume, or the fact that some figures have not been reproduced in a larger size to make it easier to inspect them. Such details however, do not tarnish the outstanding virtues of 'Evolution and Adaptation', which make it a benchmark, for specialists as well as students, of the panorama of Spanish research on evolution in the 21st century we have just entered. While it is true that the book does not include all the studies that exist, but it is no less true that all the studies included exist.... and many are included. At least enough to ensure enviable good health for evolutionary studies in our country in the coming years.

Ángel Baltanás
Department of Ecology
Faculty of Sciences
UAM

Evolution and Adaptation, 150 years after Origin of Species. Dopazo, Hernán and Navarro, Arcadi (Eds.). Editorial Obrapropia. Valencia, 2009. ISBN 978-84-92910-06-9

Evolution and Adaptation, [Contenido incluido(Id:1242651267959;Tipo:UAM_Multimedia_FA)]