Go to main contentGo to main menu

Logo de la UAMUniversidad Autónoma de Madrid

Noticias

Bone remains exhumed from Civil War mass graves are identified

07/07/2010

The Teaching Commission for Anthropology of the Department of Biology of the UAM has been collaborating for years in exhuming, identifying and returning to their families the bone remains found in the mass graves from the Spanish Civil War period. During the month of July the remains from the old cemetery of La Carcavilla (Palencia) and the mass graves of Monte La Andaya (Burgos) will be returned.

More than 370 bone remains from the different exhumations have passed through the Anthropology laboratory of the Department of Biology of the UAM, and to date more than 80 proposals of identification have been made.

The main goal of this project is to return the remains to the families, for public recognition and a dignified burial, as has already occurred in the case of the 51 remains exhumed from Villamayor de los Montes and San Juan del Monte (Burgos), and in the case of the 15 remains identified of Republican prisoners who died in the prison of Valdenoceda (Burgos).

Throughout the month of July, remains from the old cemetery of La Carcavilla (Palencia) and the mass graves of Monte La Andaya (Burgos) will be returned; cases which have a total of more than 30 proposals of identification.

Identification is always a complex process, which requires very different information to be gathered (oral testimonies, archaeological, documentary, osteological and genetic information), and in some cases the objective of identification will not be met. The work begins with exhumation, with detailed documentation of all the remains and objects recovered, and continues with the study of the bone remains in the osteology lab.

This work aims to provide a tentative identification or to create a table of compatible or excluding identities, comparing the anthropological find with the ante mortem details provided by relatives and extracted from documents that come from different archives. The goal is to direct the genetic study, relating a limited number of bone remains with a limited number of families. When all the information is consistent, the identification is proposed.

The groups of relatives and historical memory associations have played an important role in these processes. A role that goes far beyond requesting identification, as in many cases they have provided the infrastructure necessary for exhumation, and they have gathered the first testimonies and carried out the initial research in different archives.

In the case of the work carried out by the group from the UAM Department of Biology, as well as collaborating with the aforesaid associations, research has been carried out in collaboration with the genetic laboratory Labgenetics, with the University of the Basque Country, the Aranzadi Science Society and the Ministry of the Presidency.

It must be stressed that professionals from different public universities, as well as from other institutions, are prepared to carry out this task of identification, from archaeologists, physical anthropologists and biochemists exhuming and studying the bone remains to social anthropologists and historians gathering testimonies and studying the archives. With the appropriate backing, the involvement of universities in this work could be greater.

In conclusion, this work is very interesting for the people involved in it for the diversity of information generated and, fundamentally, it is a task that meets the demand of the people who have organised themselves to recover the remains of their relatives, and thus be able to close the page on their family history, which is also the history of Spain.

 

More than 370 bone remains from the different exhumations have passed through the Anthropology laboratory of the Department of Biology of the UAM, and to date more than 80 proposals of identification have been made.

The main goal of this project is to return the remains to the families, for public recognition and a dignified burial, as has already occurred in the case of the 51 remains exhumed from Villamayor de los Montes and San Juan del Monte (Burgos), and in the case of the 15 remains identified of Republican prisoners who died in the prison of Valdenoceda (Burgos).

Throughout the month of July, remains from the old cemetery of La Carcavilla (Palencia) and the mass graves of Monte La Andaya (Burgos) will be returned; cases which have a total of more than 30 proposals of identification.

Identification is always a complex process, which requires very different information to be gathered (oral testimonies, archaeological, documentary, osteological and genetic information), and in some cases the objective of identification will not be met. The work begins with exhumation, with detailed documentation of all the remains and objects recovered, and continues with the study of the bone remains in the osteology lab.

This work aims to provide a tentative identification or to create a table of compatible or excluding identities, comparing the anthropological find with the ante mortem details provided by relatives and extracted from documents that come from different archives. The goal is to direct the genetic study, relating a limited number of bone remains with a limited number of families. When all the information is consistent, the identification is proposed.

The groups of relatives and historical memory associations have played an important role in these processes. A role that goes far beyond requesting identification, as in many cases they have provided the infrastructure necessary for exhumation, and they have gathered the first testimonies and carried out the initial research in different archives.

In the case of the work carried out by the group from the UAM Department of Biology, as well as collaborating with the aforesaid associations, research has been carried out in collaboration with the genetic laboratory Labgenetics, with the University of the Basque Country, the Aranzadi Science Society and the Ministry of the Presidency.

It must be stressed that professionals from different public universities, as well as from other institutions, are prepared to carry out this task of identification, from archaeologists, physical anthropologists and biochemists exhuming and studying the bone remains to social anthropologists and historians gathering testimonies and studying the archives. With the appropriate backing, the involvement of universities in this work could be greater.

In conclusion, this work is very interesting for the people involved in it for the diversity of information generated and, fundamentally, it is a task that meets the demand of the people who have organised themselves to recover the remains of their relatives, and thus be able to close the page on their family history, which is also the history of Spain.

 

More than 370 bone remains from the different exhumations have passed through the Anthropology laboratory of the Department of Biology of the UAM, and to date more than 80 proposals of identification have been made.

The main goal of this project is to return the remains to the families, for public recognition and a dignified burial, as has already occurred in the case of the 51 remains exhumed from Villamayor de los Montes and San Juan del Monte (Burgos), and in the case of the 15 remains identified of Republican prisoners who died in the prison of Valdenoceda (Burgos).

Throughout the month of July, remains from the old cemetery of La Carcavilla (Palencia) and the mass graves of Monte La Andaya (Burgos) will be returned; cases which have a total of more than 30 proposals of identification.

Identification is always a complex process, which requires very different information to be gathered (oral testimonies, archaeological, documentary, osteological and genetic information), and in some cases the objective of identification will not be met. The work begins with exhumation, with detailed documentation of all the remains and objects recovered, and continues with the study of the bone remains in the osteology lab.

This work aims to provide a tentative identification or to create a table of compatible or excluding identities, comparing the anthropological find with the ante mortem details provided by relatives and extracted from documents that come from different archives. The goal is to direct the genetic study, relating a limited number of bone remains with a limited number of families. When all the information is consistent, the identification is proposed.

The groups of relatives and historical memory associations have played an important role in these processes. A role that goes far beyond requesting identification, as in many cases they have provided the infrastructure necessary for exhumation, and they have gathered the first testimonies and carried out the initial research in different archives.

In the case of the work carried out by the group from the UAM Department of Biology, as well as collaborating with the aforesaid associations, research has been carried out in collaboration with the genetic laboratory Labgenetics, with the University of the Basque Country, the Aranzadi Science Society and the Ministry of the Presidency.

It must be stressed that professionals from different public universities, as well as from other institutions, are prepared to carry out this task of identification, from archaeologists, physical anthropologists and biochemists exhuming and studying the bone remains to social anthropologists and historians gathering testimonies and studying the archives. With the appropriate backing, the involvement of universities in this work could be greater.

In conclusion, this work is very interesting for the people involved in it for the diversity of information generated and, fundamentally, it is a task that meets the demand of the people who have organised themselves to recover the remains of their relatives, and thus be able to close the page on their family history, which is also the history of Spain.

 

More than 370 bone remains from the different exhumations have passed through the Anthropology laboratory of the Department of Biology of the UAM, and to date more than 80 proposals of identification have been made.

The main goal of this project is to return the remains to the families, for public recognition and a dignified burial, as has already occurred in the case of the 51 remains exhumed from Villamayor de los Montes and San Juan del Monte (Burgos), and in the case of the 15 remains identified of Republican prisoners who died in the prison of Valdenoceda (Burgos).

Throughout the month of July, remains from the old cemetery of La Carcavilla (Palencia) and the mass graves of Monte La Andaya (Burgos) will be returned; cases which have a total of more than 30 proposals of identification.

Identification is always a complex process, which requires very different information to be gathered (oral testimonies, archaeological, documentary, osteological and genetic information), and in some cases the objective of identification will not be met. The work begins with exhumation, with detailed documentation of all the remains and objects recovered, and continues with the study of the bone remains in the osteology lab.

This work aims to provide a tentative identification or to create a table of compatible or excluding identities, comparing the anthropological find with the ante mortem details provided by relatives and extracted from documents that come from different archives. The goal is to direct the genetic study, relating a limited number of bone remains with a limited number of families. When all the information is consistent, the identification is proposed.

The groups of relatives and historical memory associations have played an important role in these processes. A role that goes far beyond requesting identification, as in many cases they have provided the infrastructure necessary for exhumation, and they have gathered the first testimonies and carried out the initial research in different archives.

In the case of the work carried out by the group from the UAM Department of Biology, as well as collaborating with the aforesaid associations, research has been carried out in collaboration with the genetic laboratory Labgenetics, with the University of the Basque Country, the Aranzadi Science Society and the Ministry of the Presidency.

It must be stressed that professionals from different public universities, as well as from other institutions, are prepared to carry out this task of identification, from archaeologists, physical anthropologists and biochemists exhuming and studying the bone remains to social anthropologists and historians gathering testimonies and studying the archives. With the appropriate backing, the involvement of universities in this work could be greater.

In conclusion, this work is very interesting for the people involved in it for the diversity of information generated and, fundamentally, it is a task that meets the demand of the people who have organised themselves to recover the remains of their relatives, and thus be able to close the page on their family history, which is also the history of Spain.

 [Contenido incluido(Id:1242651310461;Tipo:UAM_Multimedia_FA)]